Dreams Built Green

With over 50 years of experience, Filinvest Land, Inc. (FLI) is one of the leading full-range property developers in the Philippines with a diverse project portfolio spanning the archipelagoooooo

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PROJECTS

Our Featured Projects

Filinvest Land properties are some of the most sought after in the Philippines.

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100 West Makati

There’s nothing more valuable than time and 100 West is designed with this in mind.

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Activa Cubao

Activa Cubao is a mixed-use development that includes residential, office, and commercial spaces.

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Alta Vida

Thrive with your loved ones amid lush open spaces and relaxing amenities at Alta Vida, a refreshing low-density community within the sprawling San Rafael Estates in Bulacan.

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100 West Makati

There’s nothing more valuable than time and 100 West is designed with this in mind.

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Activa Cubao

Activa Cubao is a mixed-use development that includes residential, office, and commercial spaces.

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ABOUT US

We Build the Filipino Dream

Filinvest Land, Inc. (FLI), a subsidiary of Filinvest Development Corporation (FDC), is one of the country’s leading full-range property developers. For over 50 years, the company has built a diverse project portfolio spanning the archipelago, from its core best-value homes, to townships, mixed-use developments, mid-rise and high-rise condominiums, BPO office buildings, shopping centers, and leisure developments. Staying true to its mission, FLI continues to build the Filipino dream across the Philippines.

NEWS & STORIES

Featured Articles

Get updated to Filinvest Land's latest happenings.

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How tycoons stay fit, sane and on top of things in times of COVID-19

It’s a force majeure that has caused a lot of stress to everyone in this world. This new coronavirus pandemic dragged down the global economy, triggered tough lockdown protocols that brought the Philippines to its worst economic recession in history, exposed gaps in the health care sector and resulted in record-high job losses. As businesses ground to a halt in the early months of the contagion, imagine the pressure on the captains of the industry—those who are responsible for a throng of employees, stakeholders and their companies’ well-being. But to keep themselves on top of the situation and execute business continuity plans—apart from mobilizing resources to help the government, displaced communities and medical front-liners fight this war against COVID-19—they too have to take care of themselves during this challenging time. We talked to some of the country’s business tycoons, who shared insights on their fitness regimen as well as the necessary adjustments to their management style during these extraordinary times. Based on our survey, all business leaders have embraced new technology to allow them to manage their vast businesses remotely. While working from home has become the new norm, along with videoconferencing, some still go to the office and physically meet with their management team, while observing strict physical distancing protocols. Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala Chair and CEO of Ayala Corp. “While considered by many to be bad habits, a cocktail and a cigar at the end of the day do wonders to calm my mind, usually followed by a catch up with Lizzie, reading, or movie watching. “I try to get a motorcycle ride in most Saturdays in order to clear my mind and enjoy the relaxed banter of friends. As Milan Kundera wrote in his novel “Slowness,” “the man hunched over his motorcycle can focus only on the present … he is caught in a fragment of time cut off from both the past and the future … he has no fear because the source of fear is in the future, and the person freed of the future has nothing to fear.” Shift to a more introspective, self-reflective approach “In the early part of the pandemic I communicated far more regularly and intensely both with my senior executive team and the broader organization as a whole. Early on, Fernando and I visited some front line operations across the group to touch base with those who had operational responsibilities. As the year wore on, my schedule has become less intense, especially as we developed a firmer control and understanding of the variables that we were dealing with. I moved from a more action-oriented approach to a more introspective and self-reflective approach. This led to more mental space to plan and think for the medium and long term horizon again. I then began to overweight my time to communicating with our broader community of stakeholders, with a clearer plan of action, outside our executive and employee circle. These included more regular and granular conversations with investors, both our larger and our MSME (micro, small and medium enterprise) partners, and engaging in broader conversations across a variety of forums, both locally and abroad (all virtual) to both communicate what we were doing but also to learn from others. These included both business and academic forums. “At the beginning of the crisis, our community of executives rarely met [in-person] as we overweighted the health of our broader team. Once testing procedures began to mature and we felt we had enough safety protocols and back up health facilities in place to support the needs of our community of companies, I began to have more personal [in-person] meetings. These usually involved one-to-one meetings, either at breakfast or lunch and which, frankly, have been most pleasurable as we all miss some form of human contact with our peers.” Teresita Sy-Coson, vice chair of SM Investments and chairman of BDO Unibank: Flexibility in running business “The main lesson during this pandemic, it’s the same as everyone: count your blessings more than regrets. In the workplace, be flexible and adapt to constant changes.” Lance Gokongwei, President and CEO of JG Summit Holdings: Continuous brainstorming Manuel Villar Jr., Chair of Vista Land and AllHome Corp. “I would also spend some time in my garden. I love my garden because it relaxes me. Since my days in UP Diliman, I have learned to appreciate the beauty of nature. Lately, my wife and I would visit Coffee Project during non-peak hours just to relax and have some sense of normalcy.” Business as usual via Zoom, Teams and Webex Ramon Ang, President of San Miguel Corp. “They say a busy mind is a healthy mind. I believe that. I find that when your mind is preoccupied with things that are productive and that make a difference, or when you are focused on progressing toward your goals– no matter how small–you feel better and have a more positive outlook. “My days can get very busy, and sometimes, it can get overwhelming. But I know when I need to take a step back. Most important of all: spend quality time with my family, especially my grandchildren. That’s how I maintain balance.” Retaining sense of normalcy, continuity “As much as possible, everything is done online, and almost all meetings are via video calls. But for the more important and critical things, we still do in-person meetings, while observing the strictest safety protocols. This includes regular PCR testing for myself and our employees, proper social distancing, wearing of masks, limiting or minimizing times together to just the necessary, among others. “Actually, one reason why we have been able to retain a sense of normalcy and continuity is that we have been very proactive and consistent when it comes to putting in place safety measures. We invested to put up our own PCR testing lab, and all our employees are periodically tested to help ensure safety in the workplace. “At our head office, we installed hand-washing stations and temperature checks at all entrances of the building as well as at the receiving areas of all floors. We also retrofitted our windows to allow for more ventilation. Many are also still working from home. These measures, among many others, are also in place across all our offices and facilities. “For me, the challenge is not so much about how we change because of the pandemic, but how we adapt and cope, especially with regards to safety, while ensuring we continue to perform well, if not better.” Manuel Pangilinan, Chair and CEO of PLDT, chair of Metro Pacific Investments Corp. Staying closer to the situation “I do prefer face-to-face meetings. You can get the nuisances better. The problem with the video is that it’s usually a bilateral conversation. In a board meeting where people are physically present, you can have a bit more conversation with the other people because it’s a real dialogue. “I know things have changed quite a bit but for me, the closer I stay with the situation, the more I understand what’s going on or not going on.” Lourdes Josephine Gotianun-Yap, President and CEO of Filinvest Development Corp. “To keep fit, I exercise thru Walk at Home You tube videos coupled with Yoga stress relieving shows. Even if my husband, who is an ambassador, was in Singapore while I was in Manila, we would do Pro Walking Tours of Italian Towns together virtually. Now, I am happy I can already play golf again under strict social distancing protocols.” Focus on health of stakeholders, business “Our company does not allow face to face meetings. All our meetings are done virtually to insure social distancing. This also mitigates the risk of a COVID breakout among the leadership team.” Isidro Consunji, chair, president and CEO of DMCI Holdings “To keep my sanity in check, I play golf sometimes. Physical distancing is easier to do in a golf course! The fresh air and Vitamin D are also good for boosting the immune system.” Adapting to running business virtually “Before the pandemic, I did plant and site inspections every weekend. With the localized lockdowns, I can’t go around as much. I have to rely on virtual reporting, videos and photos to oversee our businesses. “I do face to face meetings occasionally, but in small groups and with appropriate safety protocols in place. I do the meetings in our boardroom so there’s more than enough space for physical distancing.” Sabin Aboitiz, President and CEO of Aboitiz Group “Then you have physical (activities). I swim, walk, or both almost every day.” No problem adjusting “So far, we have very little face-to-face meetings. Everyone adjusted very quickly so we did not have a problem here.” Edgar Sia II, Chair and CEO of DoubleDragon Properties and MerryMart Consumer Corp. Doing things more efficiently “The increased familiarity in using digital communications on both ends actually made things, in some cases, far more efficient in getting things done. Although overall, I thought it may be good to keep a blended approach as in the long run, too much reliance on purely digital (systems) may also cause big risk in case in the future if the world will face a virus pandemic crisis not in the air but in the cyberspace.” Edgar Saavedra, Chair and CEO of Megawide Construction Corp. More productive, more people-oriented “That’s one advantage of having a young organization – we were easily able to adjust to digitalization. We have shifted more than 80 percent of our processes and our records/files to digital. We would not have been able to achieve this in six months without the pandemic. “I’ve been going to the office every day since June. My management style has evolved significantly. I’m more people-oriented now. I have at least once-a-month engagement with the entire organization. We’ve set up systems in monitoring the output of everyone including the executives on a monthly basis. This is because of the work-from-home arrangement for some of our business units. I spend more time in developing our corporate culture and our organization.” Kevin Andrew Tan CEO, Alliance Global Group Inc. No face-to-face For more news about the novel coronavirus click here. What you need to know about Coronavirus. For more information on COVID-19, call the DOH Hotline: (02) 86517800 local 1149/1150. The Inquirer Foundation supports our healthcare frontliners and is still accepting cash donations to be deposited at Banco de Oro (BDO) current account #007960018860 or donate through PayMaya using this link . Source

corp-gov-banner

A Global Approach To Filipino Style

ward-winning interior designer Isabelle Miaja gives Filipino furniture and design an unprecedented makeover via Botanika Nature Residences, a new premium low-density residential development in Filinvest City in Alabang. Of Spanish and French descent, the US-trained, Singapore-based Miaja draws on her own multicultural heritage to create a model unit in Botanika that is a stylish yet habitable fusion of local and modern, of Filipino folk elements and the contemporary. “When we design,” says Miaja, we build every project around a story line that is connected to the place, the people, and its art, the whole cultural background.” Adding antique pieces sourced from Manila, Pampanga and other parts of the country to the model unit, she adds that “I have to reinvent everything and give it a new twist.” And reinvent she does.  The Botanika model unit, which can be seen at Commerce corner Corporate Avenues in Filinvest City, is furnished and fitted, draped and adorned with stunning pieces.  At first glance, the look appears foreign and contemporary, but on further inspection, becomes easily recognizable as Filipino. For instance, she chose to use an exquisite handcrafted dining table base that is a mosaic of small wood chips and Filipino carvings and encrusted with crystals made in the Czech Republic. “I wanted the Botanika model unit to feel different but still retail an identifiable Filipino flair,” Miaja, who has designed luxury properties in Dubai, Singapore, the Middle East, Fiji and the Maldives, says. Botanika also offers very generous living spaces, with its 369 units ranging from 123 to 343 square meters in area, all designed in a way that makes them open to nature while offering residents privacy and exclusivity. Botanika is the first of Filinvest’s Exclusive Collection, envisioned as a series of iconic projects focused on luxury. Source: 

Filinvest-Land-Banner

How tycoons stay fit, sane and on top of things in times of COVID-19

It’s a force majeure that has caused a lot of stress to everyone in this world. This new coronavirus pandemic dragged down the global economy, triggered tough lockdown protocols that brought the Philippines to its worst economic recession in history, exposed gaps in the health care sector and resulted in record-high job losses. As businesses ground to a halt in the early months of the contagion, imagine the pressure on the captains of the industry—those who are responsible for a throng of employees, stakeholders and their companies’ well-being. But to keep themselves on top of the situation and execute business continuity plans—apart from mobilizing resources to help the government, displaced communities and medical front-liners fight this war against COVID-19—they too have to take care of themselves during this challenging time. We talked to some of the country’s business tycoons, who shared insights on their fitness regimen as well as the necessary adjustments to their management style during these extraordinary times. Based on our survey, all business leaders have embraced new technology to allow them to manage their vast businesses remotely. While working from home has become the new norm, along with videoconferencing, some still go to the office and physically meet with their management team, while observing strict physical distancing protocols. Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala Chair and CEO of Ayala Corp. “While considered by many to be bad habits, a cocktail and a cigar at the end of the day do wonders to calm my mind, usually followed by a catch up with Lizzie, reading, or movie watching. “I try to get a motorcycle ride in most Saturdays in order to clear my mind and enjoy the relaxed banter of friends. As Milan Kundera wrote in his novel “Slowness,” “the man hunched over his motorcycle can focus only on the present … he is caught in a fragment of time cut off from both the past and the future … he has no fear because the source of fear is in the future, and the person freed of the future has nothing to fear.” Shift to a more introspective, self-reflective approach “In the early part of the pandemic I communicated far more regularly and intensely both with my senior executive team and the broader organization as a whole. Early on, Fernando and I visited some front line operations across the group to touch base with those who had operational responsibilities. As the year wore on, my schedule has become less intense, especially as we developed a firmer control and understanding of the variables that we were dealing with. I moved from a more action-oriented approach to a more introspective and self-reflective approach. This led to more mental space to plan and think for the medium and long term horizon again. I then began to overweight my time to communicating with our broader community of stakeholders, with a clearer plan of action, outside our executive and employee circle. These included more regular and granular conversations with investors, both our larger and our MSME (micro, small and medium enterprise) partners, and engaging in broader conversations across a variety of forums, both locally and abroad (all virtual) to both communicate what we were doing but also to learn from others. These included both business and academic forums. “At the beginning of the crisis, our community of executives rarely met [in-person] as we overweighted the health of our broader team. Once testing procedures began to mature and we felt we had enough safety protocols and back up health facilities in place to support the needs of our community of companies, I began to have more personal [in-person] meetings. These usually involved one-to-one meetings, either at breakfast or lunch and which, frankly, have been most pleasurable as we all miss some form of human contact with our peers.” Teresita Sy-Coson, vice chair of SM Investments and chairman of BDO Unibank: Flexibility in running business “The main lesson during this pandemic, it’s the same as everyone: count your blessings more than regrets. In the workplace, be flexible and adapt to constant changes.” Lance Gokongwei, President and CEO of JG Summit Holdings: Continuous brainstorming Manuel Villar Jr., Chair of Vista Land and AllHome Corp. “I would also spend some time in my garden. I love my garden because it relaxes me. Since my days in UP Diliman, I have learned to appreciate the beauty of nature. Lately, my wife and I would visit Coffee Project during non-peak hours just to relax and have some sense of normalcy.” Business as usual via Zoom, Teams and Webex Ramon Ang, President of San Miguel Corp. “They say a busy mind is a healthy mind. I believe that. I find that when your mind is preoccupied with things that are productive and that make a difference, or when you are focused on progressing toward your goals– no matter how small–you feel better and have a more positive outlook. “My days can get very busy, and sometimes, it can get overwhelming. But I know when I need to take a step back. Most important of all: spend quality time with my family, especially my grandchildren. That’s how I maintain balance.” Retaining sense of normalcy, continuity “As much as possible, everything is done online, and almost all meetings are via video calls. But for the more important and critical things, we still do in-person meetings, while observing the strictest safety protocols. This includes regular PCR testing for myself and our employees, proper social distancing, wearing of masks, limiting or minimizing times together to just the necessary, among others. “Actually, one reason why we have been able to retain a sense of normalcy and continuity is that we have been very proactive and consistent when it comes to putting in place safety measures. We invested to put up our own PCR testing lab, and all our employees are periodically tested to help ensure safety in the workplace. “At our head office, we installed hand-washing stations and temperature checks at all entrances of the building as well as at the receiving areas of all floors. We also retrofitted our windows to allow for more ventilation. Many are also still working from home. These measures, among many others, are also in place across all our offices and facilities. “For me, the challenge is not so much about how we change because of the pandemic, but how we adapt and cope, especially with regards to safety, while ensuring we continue to perform well, if not better.” Manuel Pangilinan, Chair and CEO of PLDT, chair of Metro Pacific Investments Corp. Staying closer to the situation “I do prefer face-to-face meetings. You can get the nuisances better. The problem with the video is that it’s usually a bilateral conversation. In a board meeting where people are physically present, you can have a bit more conversation with the other people because it’s a real dialogue. “I know things have changed quite a bit but for me, the closer I stay with the situation, the more I understand what’s going on or not going on.” Lourdes Josephine Gotianun-Yap, President and CEO of Filinvest Development Corp. “To keep fit, I exercise thru Walk at Home You tube videos coupled with Yoga stress relieving shows. Even if my husband, who is an ambassador, was in Singapore while I was in Manila, we would do Pro Walking Tours of Italian Towns together virtually. Now, I am happy I can already play golf again under strict social distancing protocols.” Focus on health of stakeholders, business “Our company does not allow face to face meetings. All our meetings are done virtually to insure social distancing. This also mitigates the risk of a COVID breakout among the leadership team.” Isidro Consunji, chair, president and CEO of DMCI Holdings “To keep my sanity in check, I play golf sometimes. Physical distancing is easier to do in a golf course! The fresh air and Vitamin D are also good for boosting the immune system.” Adapting to running business virtually “Before the pandemic, I did plant and site inspections every weekend. With the localized lockdowns, I can’t go around as much. I have to rely on virtual reporting, videos and photos to oversee our businesses. “I do face to face meetings occasionally, but in small groups and with appropriate safety protocols in place. I do the meetings in our boardroom so there’s more than enough space for physical distancing.” Sabin Aboitiz, President and CEO of Aboitiz Group “Then you have physical (activities). I swim, walk, or both almost every day.” No problem adjusting “So far, we have very little face-to-face meetings. Everyone adjusted very quickly so we did not have a problem here.” Edgar Sia II, Chair and CEO of DoubleDragon Properties and MerryMart Consumer Corp. Doing things more efficiently “The increased familiarity in using digital communications on both ends actually made things, in some cases, far more efficient in getting things done. Although overall, I thought it may be good to keep a blended approach as in the long run, too much reliance on purely digital (systems) may also cause big risk in case in the future if the world will face a virus pandemic crisis not in the air but in the cyberspace.” Edgar Saavedra, Chair and CEO of Megawide Construction Corp. More productive, more people-oriented “That’s one advantage of having a young organization – we were easily able to adjust to digitalization. We have shifted more than 80 percent of our processes and our records/files to digital. We would not have been able to achieve this in six months without the pandemic. “I’ve been going to the office every day since June. My management style has evolved significantly. I’m more people-oriented now. I have at least once-a-month engagement with the entire organization. We’ve set up systems in monitoring the output of everyone including the executives on a monthly basis. This is because of the work-from-home arrangement for some of our business units. I spend more time in developing our corporate culture and our organization.” Kevin Andrew Tan CEO, Alliance Global Group Inc. No face-to-face For more news about the novel coronavirus click here. What you need to know about Coronavirus. For more information on COVID-19, call the DOH Hotline: (02) 86517800 local 1149/1150. The Inquirer Foundation supports our healthcare frontliners and is still accepting cash donations to be deposited at Banco de Oro (BDO) current account #007960018860 or donate through PayMaya using this link . Source

corp-gov-banner

A Global Approach To Filipino Style

ward-winning interior designer Isabelle Miaja gives Filipino furniture and design an unprecedented makeover via Botanika Nature Residences, a new premium low-density residential development in Filinvest City in Alabang. Of Spanish and French descent, the US-trained, Singapore-based Miaja draws on her own multicultural heritage to create a model unit in Botanika that is a stylish yet habitable fusion of local and modern, of Filipino folk elements and the contemporary. “When we design,” says Miaja, we build every project around a story line that is connected to the place, the people, and its art, the whole cultural background.” Adding antique pieces sourced from Manila, Pampanga and other parts of the country to the model unit, she adds that “I have to reinvent everything and give it a new twist.” And reinvent she does.  The Botanika model unit, which can be seen at Commerce corner Corporate Avenues in Filinvest City, is furnished and fitted, draped and adorned with stunning pieces.  At first glance, the look appears foreign and contemporary, but on further inspection, becomes easily recognizable as Filipino. For instance, she chose to use an exquisite handcrafted dining table base that is a mosaic of small wood chips and Filipino carvings and encrusted with crystals made in the Czech Republic. “I wanted the Botanika model unit to feel different but still retail an identifiable Filipino flair,” Miaja, who has designed luxury properties in Dubai, Singapore, the Middle East, Fiji and the Maldives, says. Botanika also offers very generous living spaces, with its 369 units ranging from 123 to 343 square meters in area, all designed in a way that makes them open to nature while offering residents privacy and exclusivity. Botanika is the first of Filinvest’s Exclusive Collection, envisioned as a series of iconic projects focused on luxury. Source: 

Filinvest-Land-Banner

How tycoons stay fit, sane and on top of things in times of COVID-19

It’s a force majeure that has caused a lot of stress to everyone in this world. This new coronavirus pandemic dragged down the global economy, triggered tough lockdown protocols that brought the Philippines to its worst economic recession in history, exposed gaps in the health care sector and resulted in record-high job losses. As businesses ground to a halt in the early months of the contagion, imagine the pressure on the captains of the industry—those who are responsible for a throng of employees, stakeholders and their companies’ well-being. But to keep themselves on top of the situation and execute business continuity plans—apart from mobilizing resources to help the government, displaced communities and medical front-liners fight this war against COVID-19—they too have to take care of themselves during this challenging time. We talked to some of the country’s business tycoons, who shared insights on their fitness regimen as well as the necessary adjustments to their management style during these extraordinary times. Based on our survey, all business leaders have embraced new technology to allow them to manage their vast businesses remotely. While working from home has become the new norm, along with videoconferencing, some still go to the office and physically meet with their management team, while observing strict physical distancing protocols. Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala Chair and CEO of Ayala Corp. “While considered by many to be bad habits, a cocktail and a cigar at the end of the day do wonders to calm my mind, usually followed by a catch up with Lizzie, reading, or movie watching. “I try to get a motorcycle ride in most Saturdays in order to clear my mind and enjoy the relaxed banter of friends. As Milan Kundera wrote in his novel “Slowness,” “the man hunched over his motorcycle can focus only on the present … he is caught in a fragment of time cut off from both the past and the future … he has no fear because the source of fear is in the future, and the person freed of the future has nothing to fear.” Shift to a more introspective, self-reflective approach “In the early part of the pandemic I communicated far more regularly and intensely both with my senior executive team and the broader organization as a whole. Early on, Fernando and I visited some front line operations across the group to touch base with those who had operational responsibilities. As the year wore on, my schedule has become less intense, especially as we developed a firmer control and understanding of the variables that we were dealing with. I moved from a more action-oriented approach to a more introspective and self-reflective approach. This led to more mental space to plan and think for the medium and long term horizon again. I then began to overweight my time to communicating with our broader community of stakeholders, with a clearer plan of action, outside our executive and employee circle. These included more regular and granular conversations with investors, both our larger and our MSME (micro, small and medium enterprise) partners, and engaging in broader conversations across a variety of forums, both locally and abroad (all virtual) to both communicate what we were doing but also to learn from others. These included both business and academic forums. “At the beginning of the crisis, our community of executives rarely met [in-person] as we overweighted the health of our broader team. Once testing procedures began to mature and we felt we had enough safety protocols and back up health facilities in place to support the needs of our community of companies, I began to have more personal [in-person] meetings. These usually involved one-to-one meetings, either at breakfast or lunch and which, frankly, have been most pleasurable as we all miss some form of human contact with our peers.” Teresita Sy-Coson, vice chair of SM Investments and chairman of BDO Unibank: Flexibility in running business “The main lesson during this pandemic, it’s the same as everyone: count your blessings more than regrets. In the workplace, be flexible and adapt to constant changes.” Lance Gokongwei, President and CEO of JG Summit Holdings: Continuous brainstorming Manuel Villar Jr., Chair of Vista Land and AllHome Corp. “I would also spend some time in my garden. I love my garden because it relaxes me. Since my days in UP Diliman, I have learned to appreciate the beauty of nature. Lately, my wife and I would visit Coffee Project during non-peak hours just to relax and have some sense of normalcy.” Business as usual via Zoom, Teams and Webex Ramon Ang, President of San Miguel Corp. “They say a busy mind is a healthy mind. I believe that. I find that when your mind is preoccupied with things that are productive and that make a difference, or when you are focused on progressing toward your goals– no matter how small–you feel better and have a more positive outlook. “My days can get very busy, and sometimes, it can get overwhelming. But I know when I need to take a step back. Most important of all: spend quality time with my family, especially my grandchildren. That’s how I maintain balance.” Retaining sense of normalcy, continuity “As much as possible, everything is done online, and almost all meetings are via video calls. But for the more important and critical things, we still do in-person meetings, while observing the strictest safety protocols. This includes regular PCR testing for myself and our employees, proper social distancing, wearing of masks, limiting or minimizing times together to just the necessary, among others. “Actually, one reason why we have been able to retain a sense of normalcy and continuity is that we have been very proactive and consistent when it comes to putting in place safety measures. We invested to put up our own PCR testing lab, and all our employees are periodically tested to help ensure safety in the workplace. “At our head office, we installed hand-washing stations and temperature checks at all entrances of the building as well as at the receiving areas of all floors. We also retrofitted our windows to allow for more ventilation. Many are also still working from home. These measures, among many others, are also in place across all our offices and facilities. “For me, the challenge is not so much about how we change because of the pandemic, but how we adapt and cope, especially with regards to safety, while ensuring we continue to perform well, if not better.” Manuel Pangilinan, Chair and CEO of PLDT, chair of Metro Pacific Investments Corp. Staying closer to the situation “I do prefer face-to-face meetings. You can get the nuisances better. The problem with the video is that it’s usually a bilateral conversation. In a board meeting where people are physically present, you can have a bit more conversation with the other people because it’s a real dialogue. “I know things have changed quite a bit but for me, the closer I stay with the situation, the more I understand what’s going on or not going on.” Lourdes Josephine Gotianun-Yap, President and CEO of Filinvest Development Corp. “To keep fit, I exercise thru Walk at Home You tube videos coupled with Yoga stress relieving shows. Even if my husband, who is an ambassador, was in Singapore while I was in Manila, we would do Pro Walking Tours of Italian Towns together virtually. Now, I am happy I can already play golf again under strict social distancing protocols.” Focus on health of stakeholders, business “Our company does not allow face to face meetings. All our meetings are done virtually to insure social distancing. This also mitigates the risk of a COVID breakout among the leadership team.” Isidro Consunji, chair, president and CEO of DMCI Holdings “To keep my sanity in check, I play golf sometimes. Physical distancing is easier to do in a golf course! The fresh air and Vitamin D are also good for boosting the immune system.” Adapting to running business virtually “Before the pandemic, I did plant and site inspections every weekend. With the localized lockdowns, I can’t go around as much. I have to rely on virtual reporting, videos and photos to oversee our businesses. “I do face to face meetings occasionally, but in small groups and with appropriate safety protocols in place. I do the meetings in our boardroom so there’s more than enough space for physical distancing.” Sabin Aboitiz, President and CEO of Aboitiz Group “Then you have physical (activities). I swim, walk, or both almost every day.” No problem adjusting “So far, we have very little face-to-face meetings. Everyone adjusted very quickly so we did not have a problem here.” Edgar Sia II, Chair and CEO of DoubleDragon Properties and MerryMart Consumer Corp. Doing things more efficiently “The increased familiarity in using digital communications on both ends actually made things, in some cases, far more efficient in getting things done. Although overall, I thought it may be good to keep a blended approach as in the long run, too much reliance on purely digital (systems) may also cause big risk in case in the future if the world will face a virus pandemic crisis not in the air but in the cyberspace.” Edgar Saavedra, Chair and CEO of Megawide Construction Corp. More productive, more people-oriented “That’s one advantage of having a young organization – we were easily able to adjust to digitalization. We have shifted more than 80 percent of our processes and our records/files to digital. We would not have been able to achieve this in six months without the pandemic. “I’ve been going to the office every day since June. My management style has evolved significantly. I’m more people-oriented now. I have at least once-a-month engagement with the entire organization. We’ve set up systems in monitoring the output of everyone including the executives on a monthly basis. This is because of the work-from-home arrangement for some of our business units. I spend more time in developing our corporate culture and our organization.” Kevin Andrew Tan CEO, Alliance Global Group Inc. No face-to-face For more news about the novel coronavirus click here. What you need to know about Coronavirus. For more information on COVID-19, call the DOH Hotline: (02) 86517800 local 1149/1150. The Inquirer Foundation supports our healthcare frontliners and is still accepting cash donations to be deposited at Banco de Oro (BDO) current account #007960018860 or donate through PayMaya using this link . Source

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A Global Approach To Filipino Style

ward-winning interior designer Isabelle Miaja gives Filipino furniture and design an unprecedented makeover via Botanika Nature Residences, a new premium low-density residential development in Filinvest City in Alabang. Of Spanish and French descent, the US-trained, Singapore-based Miaja draws on her own multicultural heritage to create a model unit in Botanika that is a stylish yet habitable fusion of local and modern, of Filipino folk elements and the contemporary. “When we design,” says Miaja, we build every project around a story line that is connected to the place, the people, and its art, the whole cultural background.” Adding antique pieces sourced from Manila, Pampanga and other parts of the country to the model unit, she adds that “I have to reinvent everything and give it a new twist.” And reinvent she does.  The Botanika model unit, which can be seen at Commerce corner Corporate Avenues in Filinvest City, is furnished and fitted, draped and adorned with stunning pieces.  At first glance, the look appears foreign and contemporary, but on further inspection, becomes easily recognizable as Filipino. For instance, she chose to use an exquisite handcrafted dining table base that is a mosaic of small wood chips and Filipino carvings and encrusted with crystals made in the Czech Republic. “I wanted the Botanika model unit to feel different but still retail an identifiable Filipino flair,” Miaja, who has designed luxury properties in Dubai, Singapore, the Middle East, Fiji and the Maldives, says. Botanika also offers very generous living spaces, with its 369 units ranging from 123 to 343 square meters in area, all designed in a way that makes them open to nature while offering residents privacy and exclusivity. Botanika is the first of Filinvest’s Exclusive Collection, envisioned as a series of iconic projects focused on luxury. Source: 

INVESTOR RELATIONS

Investment Highlights

Filinvest Land, Inc. is a prominent real estate developer in the Philippines with a strong market presence, diverse property portfolio, prime locations, sound financial performance, emphasis on sustainability, and a history of successful project delivery, making it an attractive option for investors seeking dividend yield and capital appreciation.

KeyAreas

Total Revenues and Other Income

₱73,148,193

2020

Developments

Net Income

₱11,505,232

2020

Hectares

Parent Equity Holder's Net Income

₱8,460,929

2020

Families

Return on Assets

1.8%

2020

KeyAreas

Total Revenues and Other Income

₱71,123,592

2022

Developments

Net Income

₱8,302,660

2022

Hectares

Parent Equity Holder's Net Income

₱5,650,674

2022

Families

Return on Assets

1.2%

2022

KeyAreas

Total Revenues and Other Income

₱62,906,982

2021

Developments

Net Income

₱8,885,747

2021

Hectares

Parent Equity Holder's Net Income

₱8,885,747

2021

Families

Return on Assets

1.3%

2021

KeyAreas

Total Revenues and Other Income

₱73,148,193

2020

Developments

Net Income

₱11,505,232

2020

Hectares

Parent Equity Holder's Net Income

₱8,460,929

2020

Families

Return on Assets

1.8%

2020

KeyAreas

Total Revenues and Other Income

₱71,123,592

2022

Developments

Net Income

₱8,302,660

2022

Hectares

Parent Equity Holder's Net Income

₱5,650,674

2022

Families

Return on Assets

1.2%

2022

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